Question: What Is The Safeguarding Policy?

What are the policies for safeguarding?

Safeguarding Policies should:Demonstrate ownership of the safeguarding agenda.Maintain and review a record of concerns.Follow safe recruitment procedures, including DBS checks (by the Disclosure and Barring Service)Maintain safe premises and equipment, inside and out.More items…•.

What is the safeguarding policy in health and social care?

Safeguarding means protecting your right to live in safety, free from abuse or neglect. Local authorities have duties under the law towards people who are experiencing abuse or neglect (or are at risk of either).

What are the 5 R’s of safeguarding?

These are:Recognise.Respond.Report.Record.Refer.

What is prevent in safeguarding?

What is Prevent? … Simply put, Prevent is about safeguarding individuals from being drawn into terrorism, ensuring those vulnerable to extremist and terrorist narratives are given appropriate advice and support at an early stage. Prevent is no different to any other form of safeguarding from harm.

What are your responsibilities in safeguarding?

Safeguarding is a term that encompasses a wide range of measures and principles that ensure that basic human rights of individuals are protected. More specifically, safeguarding aims to make sure that vulnerable adults, young adults and children can live their lives free from abuse, harm and neglect.

What is a school safeguarding policy?

A school safeguarding policy details all the procedures that everyone must follow to protect children’s wellbeing. … Staff who work with children will receive safeguarding training that explains their duties for minimising risk, and the policy will summarise these duties.

What are the 6 principles of safeguarding?

What are the six principles of safeguarding?Empowerment. People being supported and encouraged to make their own decisions and informed consent.Prevention. It is better to take action before harm occurs.Proportionality. The least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented.Protection. … Partnership. … Accountability.

Is a section 47 serious?

A section 47 enquiry can of course prove to be very damaging for a child, for her parents and for their mutual relationships. In particular, the lives of parents can be badly affected if and when adverse conclusions are made about the harm that they have inflicted on their child.

What does duty of care mean in safeguarding?

A duty of Care is defined simply as a legal obligation to: Always act in the best interest of individuals and other. Not act or failure to act in a way that results in harm. To act within your competence and not take on anything you do not believe you can safely do.

What happens if safeguarding is not followed?

It also means that the duty of care extends to the suspicion of abuse taking place, so staff should be trained to identify the signs of physical or verbal mistreatment. Of course, the most serious potential consequence of a failure of safeguarding policies and procedures is the harm that the person at risk comes to.

Can you refuse a section 47?

Where the local authority shares Parental Responsibility for the child, the local authority must also consent to the paediatric assessment. A child who is of sufficient understanding may refuse some or all of the paediatric assessment, although refusal can potentially be overridden by a court.

What is a Section 42 in safeguarding?

The Care Act 2014 (Section 42) requires that each local authority must make enquiries, or cause others to do so, if it believes an adult is experiencing, or is at risk of, abuse or neglect. An enquiry should establish whether any action needs to be taken to prevent or stop abuse or neglect, and if so, by whom.

What is an example of safeguarding?

Examples of safeguarding issues include bullying, radicalisation, sexual exploitation, grooming, allegations against staff, incidents of self-harm, forced marriage, and FGM.

What is the difference between safeguarding and child protection?

In short terms, safeguarding is what we do to prevent harm, while child protection is the way in which we respond to harm.

What happens after a section 47?

CSC may decide to hold an initial child protection conference if the Section 47 investigation decides that the child ‘has suffered or is likely to suffer significant harm’. … assess if the child is likely to suffer significant harm, which category of harm, and whether the harm is due to the care they are receiving.

What are the 3 basic principles for safeguarding information?

Empowerment: people being supported and encouraged to make their own decisions and give informed consent. Prevention: it is better to take action before harm occurs. Proportionality: the least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented. Protection: support and representation for those in greatest need.

How do you safeguard in schools?

Schools should:Create safe environments for children and young people through robust safeguarding practices.Ensure that adults who work in the school, including volunteers, don’t pose a risk to children.Make sure staff are trained, know how to respond to concerns and keep-up-to-date with policy and practice.More items…

Why is it important to have a safeguarding policy?

Safeguarding adults policy and procedures set out the best practice framework for your organisation to respond to safeguarding concerns. … Organisations that fail to do this risk failing to meet their duty of care, which at worst could leave adults at risk vulnerable to harm.